Mysteryshows.com Forum Index Mysteryshows.com
Discuss old time radio here
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Lum and Abner
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Mysteryshows.com Forum Index -> Comedy
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:45 am    Post subject: Lum and Abner Reply with quote

It took me a while, but I have about 1300 Lum and Abner shows now in chronological order. I'm missing a few and doubt they are available.

In already up to 1944. If you familiar with the series, Grandpap has lost his memory and thinks he's a vacuum cleaner saleseman.

The show is lots of fun. Abner is so stupid! haha. Razz
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Brad
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Oct 2007
Posts: 1031
Location: Channahon, IL, USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Lum and Abner Reply with quote

Jimbo wrote:
It took me a while, but I have about 1300 Lum and Abner shows now in chronological order. I'm missing a few and doubt they are available.

In already up to 1944. If you familiar with the series, Grandpap has lost his memory and thinks he's a vacuum cleaner saleseman.

The show is lots of fun. Abner is so stupid! haha. Razz



Sound like a good time Jim Laughing


Brad
_________________
Visit our home page http://www.mysteryshows.com for thousands of free old time radio shows.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 3:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of fun Brad.

I have noticed how Lum and Abner are mentioned in many other LIVE comedy shows as well; Jack Benny, Phil Harris/Alice Faye, etc. It must have been a very popular show.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
crich70



Joined: 19 Sep 2008
Posts: 322
Location: Monroe Wisconsin

PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to "On The Air" Lum and Abner started in 1931 and was on the air til 1950 so I'd have to agree it was popular. of course back when the series started we were in the Great Depression and then WWII so I think it's safe to say that people needed something to laugh about to take their minds off of their problems too. People went to the movies a lot back then for the same reason. Apparently much of the 1941-1945 run was cut up for syndication, but much has been pieced back together including the original commercials (according to OTA). It became more like a normal sitcom in 1948. The series was also based in real life as the stars were from a town in Arkansas though both were college graduates.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 3:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

crich70 wrote:
According to "On The Air" Lum and Abner started in 1931 and was on the air til 1950 so I'd have to agree it was popular. of course back when the series started we were in the Great Depression and then WWII so I think it's safe to say that people needed something to laugh about to take their minds off of their problems too. People went to the movies a lot back then for the same reason. Apparently much of the 1941-1945 run was cut up for syndication, but much has been pieced back together including the original commercials (according to OTA). It became more like a normal sitcom in 1948. The series was also based in real life as the stars were from a town in Arkansas though both were college graduates.


Thanks for the info.

Having listened to the "normal sitcom" ('4Cool it is horrible, IMO. It's forced and many new (and horrible) characters are added.

In the early shows (and mine start in 1935) almost all the characters were done by Chester Lauck and Norris Goff. They mispronounce almost every word more than 6 letters. It's almost always worth a laugh.

I don't remember if I stated this earlier but I listen to just one show a day. This gives a real rhythm to show and I will walk around thinking, "What will Lum and Abner get themselves into today?"

Pretty simple country comedy but highly recommedned.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey all. I've been a fan of Lum and Abner for many years. My Mom told me she enjoyed them as a kid in the 1940's, so I've always wanted to hear the same shows she enjoyed. (I'm 42 btw). I really enjoy the more subtle brand of humor in LA -I like that it's not just the same joke and patter formula with a studio audience as many other comedy shows of the era. (The later shows with an audience repulse me! I don't know if I'll be able to make it through an entire episode of those- tried once and failed.) I love other standard comedy shows, but LA works best with just the two of them and no audience or sitcom formula.

For the past several years, I've listened to a several Lum and Abner episodes every night, in chronological order. I started with the year 1935, and currently am listening around mid-1946.

It was fascinating to go completely through World War II with the series, and in a way re-living the war years as they unfolded. Listening in order before and during the war, I really got an overview of how shows like this were both an escape from the war itself, but also reminders of things like war bond drives, rationing, the draft, etc. Listening now at the start of the post-war era, I find it interesting how the subtext is the return to a peace time economy and the rebuilding efforts in Europe. Just listening to a few episodes here and there doesn't give one the full picture, as the real context of the times is often buried in the banter.

It's taken me a while to really pick out which characters are Lauck, and which are Goff. Many times, it's really hard to believe it's just the two of them.

It can be jarring when they have a guest star- and when a female voice is heard, it's really jarring! It's cool to note the 'tricks' they often employ to keep from actually voicing many of the characters (especially females) even when they are deeply involved with the stories. My least favorite moment would have to be an episode where we actually hear Abner's wife 'Lizbeth speak. I'd much rather just imagine her -and other similar characters like Ms. Emaline- than actually hear them. Suddenly hearing characters that never spoke in 10 years or more of shows just feels like such a 'cheat'.

Another interesting thing about Lum and Abner is how the storylines meander. It generally takes a bit of a time investment to see a storyline complete. And often there isn't an ending; the stories will just take off on a new tangent as the characters seem to just forget all about something that had been building up for a while. That can get mildly frustrating when you were really looking forward to an outcome to some crazy scheme of Lum's or what-have-you, but generally whatever new tangent they get caught up in takes over the imagination and so all the glaring loose ends can be overlooked.

Anyway, I wonder if Lauck and Goff ever imagined they'd have new generations of fans following their creations long e after the show left the airwaves? I can't help but imagine they'd have loved the idea of computers and the Internet carrying their lives' work so far into the future.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zap wrote:
Hey all. I've been a fan of Lum and Abner for many years. My Mom told me she enjoyed them as a kid in the 1940's, so I've always wanted to hear the same shows she enjoyed. (I'm 42 btw). I really enjoy the more subtle brand of humor in LA -I like that it's not just the same joke and patter formula with a studio audience as many other comedy shows of the era. (The later shows with an audience repulse me! I don't know if I'll be able to make it through an entire episode of those- tried once and failed.) I love other standard comedy shows, but LA works best with just the two of them and no audience or sitcom formula.


Exactly. They did that live show in 1948 (I think it was) and it's just horrible. Everything seems forced. Abner is totally not funny at all in the live show.

Quote:
For the past several years, I've listened to a several Lum and Abner episodes every night, in chronological order. I started with the year 1935, and currently am listening around mid-1946.


You are a bit ahead of me. It's a lot of fun the way we are doing it, isn't it?

Quote:
It was fascinating to go completely through World War II with the series, and in a way re-living the war years as they unfolded. Listening in order before and during the war, I really got an overview of how shows like this were both an escape from the war itself, but also reminders of things like war bond drives, rationing, the draft, etc. Listening now at the start of the post-war era, I find it interesting how the subtext is the return to a peace time economy and the rebuilding efforts in Europe. Just listening to a few episodes here and there doesn't give one the full picture, as the real context of the times is often buried in the banter.


I so much agree with you. I went through Fibber McGee and Molly a couple of years ago and Great Gildersleeve too, it was like I was went through the war with the folks in the US. Bonds, food rationing and stamp books, car-pooling etc.

Quote:
It's taken me a while to really pick out which characters are Lauck, and which are Goff. Many times, it's really hard to believe it's just the two of them.


Again, I totally agree. Maybe we could find/make up a list of who is who? I'll look around for one, otherwise, we could try and make a list.


Quote:
It can be jarring when they have a guest star- and when a female voice is heard, it's really jarring! It's cool to note the 'tricks' they often employ to keep from actually voicing many of the characters (especially females) even when they are deeply involved with the stories. My least favorite moment would have to be an episode where we actually hear Abner's wife 'Lizbeth speak. I'd much rather just imagine her -and other similar characters like Ms. Emaline- than actually hear them. Suddenly hearing characters that never spoke in 10 years or more of shows just feels like such a 'cheat'.


Wow, your experiences are so similar to my own!

Barabara Stanwyck was on a show the other day (she was on a bond tour in Arkansas) and I was like, whoa, a woman! And some lady popped in the show yesterday, playing Charity Spears (Grandpap's wife - rather Buster p> Davenport, he lost his memory!) And when I heard her, I was like, was that Lum or Abner? Smile

Quote:
Another interesting thing about Lum and Abner is how the storylines meander. It generally takes a bit of a time investment to see a storyline complete. And often there isn't an ending; the stories will just take off on a new tangent as the characters seem to just forget all about something that had been building up for a while. That can get mildly frustrating when you were really looking forward to an outcome to some crazy scheme of Lum's or what-have-you, but generally whatever new tangent they get caught up in takes over the imagination and so all the glaring loose ends can be overlooked.


Haha I know. And there are the occasional missing episodes and I wonder, what the hell happened to Cedrick getting married? (or whatever.)

Another odd thing is how at the end of the show they walk away from the microphone as the end zinger comes in...

Quote:
Anyway, I wonder if Lauck and Goff ever imagined they'd have new generations of fans following their creations long e after the show left the airwaves? I can't help but imagine they'd have loved the idea of computers and the Internet carrying their lives' work so far into the future.


I really doubt it. Lum and Abner is a very complex universe. I haven't taken the time to explore the several web sites devoted to them but I think I will do that today. Pine Ridge is inside of my mind and I have a map of it in there. It's a wonderful place.

Thanks for your post and please feel free to comment some more.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to http://www.angelfire.com/ar/lumworld/history.html,

Quote:
Lauck played the characters of Lum Edwards, Granpappy Spears, and Cedric Weehunt. Goff played Abner Peabody, Dick Huddleston, Mousey Grey, and Squire Skimp. Lauck and Goff rarely used their scripts, except on the rare occasion that a guest appeared. They usually just ad-libbled through most of the show.


I also know that Goff played the character, Ulysses S. Quincy (he sounds very much like Squire Skimp and mostly, he just says, "O-kay, O-kay.")

I get a laugh just thinking about each character. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a list of all the characters known to be on the show: (from http://www.roadstoeverywhere.com/Lum&Abner/census.html)

* Abernathy, Clave
* Abernathy, Widder (Lydia or Ione or Beulah, different names at different times)
* Abernathy, Kenneth (Widder's son)
* Abernathy, Ronald (Widder's son)
* Abernathy, Clarence (Widder's son)
* Abernathy, Roscoe (Widder's son)
* Abernathy, 5 other young'uns
* Abernathy, Sude (in prison in Oklahoma)
* Ackerman, Jud
* Adams, Buford
* Adams, Gilroy (nice fellow, always says "hi")
* Amity, Old Uncle Bob
* Anderson, Alf (died in spring of 1940)
* Arrington, Newt (known for horse trading)
* Arrington, Hazel (Newt's woman)
* Atkins, Rad
* Atkins, Rad's boys
* Bailey, Jack
* Bailey, Wes
* Barns, Aint Bessie
* Barton, Mr.
* Barton, Mrs. (neighbor of the Quincys)
* Barton, Sibyl (went to nursing school with Little Pearl)
* Barton, Helen (went to nursing school with Little Pearl)
* Bates, Albert
* Bates, Beulah
* Bates, Gomer (Cedric's buddy)
* Bates, Grandpa
* Bates, Grandma
* Bates, Jim
* Bates, Little Clarence
* Bates, Little Doodie
* Bates, Louella (or Emma?) (Walt's woman)
* Bates, Mildred (married Ernest McMillan)
* Bates, Near-eyes
* Bates, Orville
* Bates, Shorty (Cedric's buddy)
* Bates, Walt (ran the sawmill and defense plant)
* Beason, Ed (and his folks, from Correnth)
* Beaumont, Widder (came to Pine Ridge to meet Lum)
* Beaumont, 7 young'uns
* Beavers, Elmer
* Beckley, Ed (runs the drug store and soda fountain)
* Beckley, Mrs. (Ed's woman)
* Beckley, Emory (Ed's oldest boy)
* Bedford, Slick
* Benson, Tom
* Biddle, Aggie
* Bjornson, Gustave (unsure of spelling, worker at Walt Bates' saw mill, wanted a personalized mug at Lum's barber shop)
* Blake, Jim (Abner once arrested Caleb Weehunt for shooting at him)
* Bledsoe, Ol' Man (depositor of $12 in Lum & Abner's bank)
* Blevins, Bernie (girl)
* Blevins, Bessie (Tom's woman)
* Blevins, Clarence (one of Cedric's pals)
* Blevins, Eugene (carpenter)
* Blevins, Florrie (Lucy's mama)
* Blevins, Herman
* Blevins, Lucy (in the 4th Reader with Cedric)
* Blevins, Luther
* Blevins, Mildred
* Blevins, Robert (killed in the war)
* Blevins, Tom
* Bradford, little girls (friends of Little Pearl)
* Bradley, Phineas
* Brooks, Mr.
* Brooks, Mrs.
* Brooks, Maudie
* Burton, Ernest
* Burl, Willard
* Calvin, Blake
* Carter, Old Man Cull
* Chester, Bashful Dave (married one of the Haskin girls)
* Childers, Foster
* Childers, Mrs. Foster
* Childers, Little Caldwell
* Childers, Hortense
* Childers, Homer (twin to Hortense)
* Clancy, Frank (one of Cedric's buddies)
* Clark, Agatha (Dave's woman, a de-fense worker)
* Clark, Dave
* Clark, Lucy Belle (Shad's oldest girl)
* Clark, Shad
* Cobb, Widder
* Collins, Cal
* Collins, Jim
* Collins, Uncle Newt
* Connors, Ellie (aka Mary Ed'ards, Lum's adopted niece)
* Cook, Doc (mentioned in 1933)
* Crawford, Frank
* Crockett, Dad (proprietor of the pool hall)
* Crockett, Barrell Legs (Dad Crockett's son)
* Crosby, Clayton Curly
* Dalton, Old Man
* Davis, Dan
* Davis, Slim
* Davis, Marty
* Davis, Mrs. Slim
* Davis, Little Boy
* Degutrie, Clealfiel (unsure of spelling, worker at Walt Bates' saw mill, wanted a personalized mug at Lum's barber shop)
* DeWitt, PeeWee (a little bitty skinny young'un, an awful cry-baby)
* DeWitt, Ol' Frank (PeeWee's papa)
* DeWitt, 3 girls
* Dilbeck, Charlie
* Dilbeck, Mrs. Charlie
* Dillihoney, Mrs.
* Dixon, Elbert
* Dixon, Frog
* Donnely, Pete
* Doolittles, The
* Douglas, Mr. (runs the garage back of Frank Foster's place)
* Douglas, Ham
* Duncan, Mr. (ex-serviceman)
* Duncan, Mrs.
* Edwards, Lum (Columbus)
* Eberts, Whitey (Cedric's pal)
* Elkins, Frank (the photographer)
* Evans, Ira
* Farnsworth, Buddy (married Boss Simmons' girl)
* Farnsworth, Maudie
* Faulk, Dad
* Ferguson, Cannonball
* Fields, Oscar
* Foss, Dan
* Foster, Frank (ran the filling station)
* Foster, Mrs. Frank
* Foster, Frank's little girl
* Foster, Melvin
* Foster, Skinny (Cedric's buddy)
* Foster, Shorty (Cedric's buddy)
* Foster, Wimpy (Cedric's buddy)
* Foster, Tom
* Foster, Rube
* Foster, Rube's boy (serving time in Alcatrez for selling dogs through the mail)
* Friar, Whistlin' Bill
* Fried, Uncle Benson (ran away with a widder woman to live in Montgomery County)
* Gaddis, Jim
* Gandel, "Spud" (Real name: Irving Filmore Gandel, married Miss Evalena, the school teacher)
* Gantlin, Bessie
* Garland, Old Man Bud
* Garland, 8 boys (sons of Bud)
* Garrett, Hugh
* Gaston, Violet
* Gates, Tuffy
* Gilbert, Mrs.
* Gilbert, boy in the service
* Goshen, Emmett
* Goshen, Mrs. Emmett
* Gray, Mousey (Lewellyn Snavely)
* Gray, Gussie Hogan (Mousey's wife, just like a mother to him)
* Green, Judge (took dinner with the Peabodys once)
* Green, Turkey (a half-blood Cherokee Indian)
* Harrison, Mickey (has more political buttons on his hat than Cedric does)
* Haskin, Girls
* Hataway, Homer
* Hatstaff, Al
* Hatten, Alice (lives down there in Shady)
* Hausner, Jerry (actually a character actor on the show, but Lum once referred to him as a resident of Pine Ridge!)
* Hawkins, Vesper
* Hazard, Hap
* Herman, Charles (alias Okie Herman, bank robber along with the Waldern Boys)
* Hilton, Shorty
* Hobbs, Big Oversized Girl
* Hodgkins, Ira
* Hodgkins, Josie (Ira's woman)
* Hodgkins, Dillard
* Hodgkins, Grandpa
* Hogan, Snake (Gussie Gray's brother)
* Hogan, Mrs. (Snake's woman)
* Hogan, Robert (one of Snake's boys)
* Hoskins, Harry (disappeared about 1925)
* Huddleston, Dick (J. Richard, the postmaster)
* Huddleston, Mrs. Dick
* Huddleston, Ethel (Dick's girl)
* Hudgins, Charley
* Hughes, Charlie
* Hutton, Howard
* Jackson, Corny
* Jeff the Butcher
* Jenkins, Homer
* Jenkins, Lije
* Jessup, Widder (Abner let her move into Lum's house when he thought Lum had "suicided hisself.")
* Jessup, young'uns
* Johnson, Gus (Abner and 'Lizabeth were quarantined at the Johnson farm with the measles.)
* Johnson, Mrs.
* Johnson, Jackie (The littlest Johnson young'un)
* Johnson, young'uns
* Johnson, Uncle Earl
* Johnson, Bertha
* Jones, Jim
* Karney, Stingy Steve
* Kilgore, Homer (Mousey's partner in the three-legged race at the 4th of July picnic.)
* Koskioskus, Ignious (unsure of spelling, worker at Walt Bates' saw mill, wanted a personalized mug at Lum's barber shop)
* Littletton, Manny
* Lubbock, Ned (farmer who was having to move out of Pine Ridge when the truck route changed)
* Ludlow, Grimey (a friend of Grandpap)
* Lunsford, Uncle Henry (town marshal)
* Lunsford, Aunt Kit (Uncle Henry's woman)
* Lunsford, Sylvia (Uncle Henry's old maid sister)
* Lunsford, Berthy (married the Farnsworth boy over at Cherry Hill)
* Lunsford, Bular (Uncle Henry's daughter)
* Lurch, Frank (a friend of Grandpap's)
* Lutrow, Charlie
* McCloud, Red
* McDannel, Aint Phebe
* McGillacuddy, Peter
* McGuire, Arnold (one of Cedric's buddies)
* McMillan, Old Man
* McMillan, Mrs.
* McMillan, Ernest (buddy of Cedric's, fought in the War)
* McMillan, other boys
* McMillan, Rad
* Maddix, Lonzo
* Madison, Buford
* Madison, Whitey
* Mail Carrier
* Mail Carrier's wife
* Mail Carrier's child
* Martin, Sid
* Masters, Grandpa (Otis)
* Masters, Grandma (Clementine)
* Masters, Wilbur (Grandpa & Grandpa's boy in the Navy)
* Maxwell, Onnie
* Medford, Alf
* Medford, Bob
* Medford, Jim
* Medford, Lonnie
* Medford, Tommy (Alf's little boy)
* Meeks, Grandma
* Mallard, Dick
* Miller, Bernie
* Miller, Doc (Cyrus W.)
* Miller, Frederick (defense worker from Germany)
* Miller, Odie
* Monroe, Tom
* Monroe, Mrs. Tom
* Moots, Mose (the barber)
* Moots, Melvie (Mose's woman)
* Moots, Little Mose
* Mullins, Mrs.
* Nunley, Ira (works at saw mill)
* Oliver, Agatha (a boarder at Sister Simpson's boarding house)
* Osaskiwach, Gladinski (unsure of spelling, worker at Walt Bates' saw mill, wanted a personalized mug at Lum's barber shop)
* Overturf, Bessie
* Parish, Brother (kin to Medfords, as is Grandpap)
* Parks, Lester
* Peabody, Abner
* Peabody, 'Lizabeth (Abner's woman)
* Peabody, Little Pearl (Abner's girl)
* Peabody, Phineas Stonewall (Abner's papa)
* Pitts, Beulah (a schoolgirl who sits next to Kenny Pomeroy)
* Phillips, Luther
* Phillips, Maudie (Luther's woman)
* Phillips, Essie (the self-proclaimed fattest woman in the county)
* Phillips, Bertha
* Phillips, Beulah
* Phillips, Maimie
* Phillips, Maimie's little boy
* Phillips, Oscar (Luther's little boy)
* Phillips, Rex
* Pomeroy, Earl
* Pomeroy, Elsie (Earl's woman)
* Pomeroy, Cyclone
* Pomeroy, Kenny (Ellie Connor's beau)
* Pomeroy, Maudie
* Potter, Beanpole
* Polk, Howard
* Powers, Uncle Zeke (was hung for horse stealing)
* Ralston, Lefty
* Rankins, Obie
* Rankins, Rufe
* Rankins, Rufe's family
* Rankins, Grandma (Rufe's mother)
* Redfield, Charlie
* Redfield, Mrs. Charlie
* Redfield, Winnifred (Charlie's daughter with the big teeth)
* Reynolds, Alvy
* Reynolds, Ike (works at the saw mill)
* Reynolds, Mrs. Ike
* Reynolds, Uncle Luke (Walter's uncle, passed on to his re-ward in 1934)
* Reynolds, Walter
* Ridgeway, Blair
* Riggens, Brother (the circuit rider)
* Riley, Gidcum (Cedric's pal)
* Rollins, Bob (aspires to be a railroad man, if the railroad ever comes to Pine Ridge)
* Rollins, Mrs. Bob (who has to support the family in the meantime)
* Rollins, Les
* Rollins, young'uns
* Quincy, Ulysses S.
* Quincy, Carrie (Ulysses' woman)
* Quincy, Little Ellery (age 6 and can already say "patty cake"!)
* Quincy, Fred
* Saxon, Verbena (9-year-old schoolgirl whose name Cedric drew for Valentines)
* Saxon, Mrs. (Verbena's mama)
* Saxon, Lucy (went with Frank Foster for awhile)
* Seestrunk, Ezra
* Seestrunk, Maimie (Ezra's woman, the telephone operator)
* Seestrunk, Ezra Jr.
* Seestrunk, Clarabelle (Cedric's sweetheart)
* Seestrunk, Desdemony (Ezra's old maid sister)
* Seestrunk, Gertrude
* Seestrunk, Geraldine
* Seestrunk, Little Herman
* Seestrunk, Tommy
* Seestrunk, Ben (hid out in Greasy Cove during the war because he was a "slacker")
* Sheldon, Charlie (won 1st place in the potato race at the Old Settler's Picnin in 1912)
* Simmons, Boss
* Simmons, Boss' girl (married Buddy Farnsworth)
* Simpson, Sister (Ella, runs the boarding house)
* Skimp, "Squire" Maynard K.
* Skimp, Cora (Squire's woman)
* Skimp, Bertha
* Skimp, Beulah
* Skinner, Bertha
* Smith, Charlie
* Smith, Mattie
* Smith, Rufe
* Smith, Riley
* Smith, Uncle John (Rufe's brother)
* Spears, "Grandpap" Milford Avery (His hated childhood nickname was "Dimples Sissybritches"!)
* Spears, Aunt Charity (Grandpap's woman)
* Spears, Luke (Grandpap's nephew, runs the Lunchroom)
* Spears, Mrs. Luke
* Spears, Luke's passel of young'uns
* Spencer, Will (the printer)
* Spinks, Loren (had one web foot, could only swim in circles)
* Standridge, Olen (caught a 40 pound catfish in the Eddy)
* Stetaninus, Gasperry (unsure of spelling, worker at Walt Bates' saw mill, wanted a personalized mug at Lum's barber shop)
* Stroobin, Corny
* Tarkum, Mrs. (Ira Hodgkins' mother-in-law)
* Terry, Brother (the preacher)
* Tewks, Maude
* Thacker, Arch
* Thatcher, Mr.
* Thatcher, Mrs. (Eli White's sister-in-law)
* Thatcher, Silly
* Tilford, Mr.
* Tilford, Mrs.
* Toliver, Old Man
* Tucker, Gidcum
* Waldern, Roy (bank robber along with brother Tom, and Charles Herman, captured by 'Lizabeth Peabody)
* Waldern, Tom (bank robber)
* Warner, Paul
* Watkins, Homer
* Watkins, Rufe
* Watson, Stingy Jim
* Watson, Whiney Bill
* Watson, Mrs.
* Webb, Old Man
* Weehunt, Caleb (Cedric's papa, the blacksmith)
* Weehunt, Mrs. (Cedric's mama)
* Weehunt, Cedric Wolfgang
* Weehunt, Louella (Cedric's little sister)
* Weehunt, Jim
* White, Eli
* White, Mrs.Eli
* White, Eli's boy
* Whitten, Riley
* Wilkerson, Rufe
* Wilkerson, Mrs. Rufe
* Wilkerson, fine baby boy
* Wilkerson, other young'ns
* Wilkins, Grandma
* Wilkins, Dulcy
* Williams, Whistlin' Jim
* Willis, George
* Willis, Mrs. George
* Wilson, Luke
* Withers, Ben (for awhile the town vet)
* Withers, Charlie
* Withers, Old Whinin' Jim
* Withers, Mrs. Jim
* Withers, Ruthie (Jim's little girl)
* Wormly, Orlo (says "hello" to Grandpap every time he comes to town)
* Willie the Boodler (tramp who often sleeps at the jail)
* Ziegler, Ollie

Citizens of Out-lying Areas

* Adams, Courtney (Buford's brother, lives south of Oden)
* Barnes, Ezra (lives down in Opal)
* Bonner, Blackie ("murderer" who was in jail with Lum & Abner at Cherry Hill - actually a deputy sheriff in disguise)
* Branley, Dr. Henry W. (dentist in Little Rock that Grandpap met once)
* Calkins, Mr. (over at Cherry Hill)
* Chase, Les (from Oden)
* Chase, Les' pa
* Clardy, Myra (Tom Blevan's sister-in-law in Oden)
* Medford, Dalt (the sheriff's brother-in-law, lives in Cherry Hill)
* Dilbeck, Mr. (banker at the county seat)
* Farnsworth, Louella and family (acquaintances of 'Lizabeth Peabody, moved from Pine Ridge to Greasy Cove)
* Finks, Mr. (vice-president of Union Bank in Mena)
* Ferrell, Clyde (from Mt. Ida, shot a man around 1934)
* Goff's Drummer (salesman from the wholesale house at the county seat)
* Newton, Mary (lives south of Oden)
* Norton, Mr. (lawyer from Mena who defended L&A when they were arrested for robbing the Cherry Hill post office) Polk, Howard (mayor of Pine Ridge who moved to Oklahoma)
* Priddle, Penelope (librarian at the county seat that Lum falls for)
* Putnam, Mr. (from Oden)
* Radford, Mr. (banker at Mt. Ida)
* Tate, Professor (schoolteacher from Oden)
* Watts, Pack Rat (a resident of Cherry Hill, a cleptomaniac known by Grandpap)
* West, Jim (over at Cherry Hill)

Schoolteachers (at various times)

* Professor Marion Sloane
* Professor Harrison (Miss Frederick's predecessor)
* Professor Webster (once boarded with the Peabodys)
* Miss Frediericks
* Miss Mary Evalena Schultz (married Spud Gandel)
* Miss Emaline Platt (Lum was sweet on her for the longest time)
* Miss Katherine Colvert (followed Evalena Schultz)

Out-of-area Relatives

* Edwards, Uncle Lije (Lum's uncle prospecting for silver in Colorado)
* Grump, Ol' Man (Abner's father-in-law)
* Grump, Ol' Lady (Abner's mother-in-law)
* Grump, Fred (Abner's brother-in-law who lives in Minniola, Texas)
* Grump, Ed (another of Abner's brothers-in-law, or possibly another name for Fred?)
* Grump, Uncle Jake ('Lizabeth's brother, deceased)
* Grump, Kate (Fred's woman)
* Grump, Erma (also named as Fred's woman, or maybe this is Ed's woman?)
* Grump, Vernon (another of 'Lizabeth's brothers)
* Powell, Uncle Zeke's boy (in the penitentary)
* Spears, Cecil (Grandpap's son who lives in Oklahoma)
* Spears, Hillary (Grandpap's other son)
* Spears, Grandpap's daughter who lives in Kansas City
* Grandpap's Uncle Frank from Hannibal, Missouri
* 'Lizabeth's Aunt Agatha
* 'Lizabeth's Cousin Homer
* 'Lizabeth's niece, Dulcy
* 'Lizabeth's uncle who was lynched
* Cedric's uncle in Fort Smith
* Cedric's Uncle Dave
* Cedric's Uncle Ervin
* Lum's Uncle Zurney in Wisconsin

Animals and Other Non-Human Characters

* Ol' Blue (Abner's dog)
* Ol' Lead (Lum's dog)
* Ol' Trump (Ezra Seestrunk's dog)
* Avery the Talkin' Donkey (Granpap told Abner that he once heard this donkey talk with his own two ears)
* Clyde the Ghost (Charlie Redfield used to converse with him accordin' to Granpap)
* Clyde the Mouse
* Robert the Robot
* Mr. Dilbeck (the Jot 'Em Down Store mannequin, named after the banker at the county seat)
* Geraldine and her kittens (the Jot 'Em Down Store cat)
* Pinky Winky (a storybook character of which Cedric is a big fan)
* General the Parrot (can say "The Marines are coming!")
* Chester the Turkey (Lum fed him hot tamales to fatten him up for Thanksgiving)
* Garfield (Grandpap's one-man dog who wouldn't let Grandpap in the yard)
* Dixie Belle and Mary Jane (races horses at the county seat that Abner bet on once)
* Ervin the Lion
* Matildy (Grandpap's cat)

Guest Characters

* Barbara Stanwyck (visited several times to help promote War Bonds)
* Birdy Collins (from Coffeyville, Kansas; came with the intention of marrying Lum)
* B.J. Webster (wanted to put in a health spa in Pine Ridge)
* Bob Hope
* Buster V. Davenport (AKA Grandpap with amensia)
* D. Hempstead Dwyer (film company president)
* Diogenes Smith (a counterfeiter who worked out of the feed room. Real name Roswell Graham.)
* Dr. Fontaine Grill (left a box containing Robert the Robot in Lum & Abner's care)
* Dr. Roller (the Pest Controller)
* Dr. Samuel Snide (a dentist)
* Duncan Hines (discovered the Lumburger)
* FCC Man (played by Howard McNear)
* Gregory W. W. Dobbs (posed as an architect in one of Squire's schemes)
* Hisari of Tibet (wanted the Kunlan Diamond back from Lum & Abner)
* Hortense Kelly
* Iron Ike (a fighter)
* J.W. Tiffin
* Jack Benny
* Jake (Abner's brother-in-law who worked very slowly at the store for awhile)
* Jimmy Diamond (Bob Hope's agent)
* John Devroe (left diamonds in Lum & Abner's bank)
* Kay Kyser (came to Arkansas looking for a flower)
* King Florida, Knight of the Road (tramp friend of Willie the Boodler)
* Kitty (the lady barber who worked for Mose for awhile)
* Knuckles Stroats
* Lady Brilton (played by Edna Best)
* Little Charlie/Little Lum (an abandoned baby left in Lum & Abner's care)
* Llewellyn Edwards (Lum's mythical twin brother)
* Lulu Watts (champion weightlifter)
* Mabel Melrose (a candidate in the elect-a-wife-for-Lum contest)
* Malcolm Kilgore (alias John Devroe)
* Mort Hanson (the photographer who takes the giant picture of Lum & Abner for their re-opening sale)
* Mr. Blair (Lum & Abner's lawyer in the abandoned baby case)
* Mr. Carter (representative of Southwest Oil Co. from Tulsa)
* Mr. Dennison (school official)
* Mr. Frisby (agent for Farm & Needlework Weekly)
* Mr. & Mrs. Findlay (parents of "Little Charlie"--Squire's niece & nephew)
* Mr. Hatstaff (Bob Hope's advance publicity man)
* Mr. Hedges (the drummer who sells Abner 10 cases of soap)
* Mr. Sutton (played by Frank Graham)
* Mr. Talbet (played by Howard McNear)
* Mr. Talbet's father (played by Ken Christy)
* Mr. Thorndyke
* Mrs. J. Simpson Barrington
* Neosho the Mystic (never showed up, Abner impersonated him)
* Otis Bagley (played by Dink Trout)
* Penelope Priddle (librarian from the county seat)
* Prince Ali Kush (brought into town by Squire to heal Lum's fake broken leg)
* Professor Crenshaw (genealogist)
* Professor Hinkledorf
* Professor & Mrs. Willowby (voice teacher and his woman)
* Rowena (Ezra Seestrunk's cousin, played by Isabel Randolph)
* Sgt. V.W. Hartford (played by Lurene Tuttle, comes to Pine Ridge to help run store)
* Tom Breneman (held a funny hat contest in Hollywood)
* Virgil Kleepsies (movie salesman)
* W. J. Chancellor (wanted to write a book about Lum & Abner's adventures)
* Zenora, the bareback rider (a circus performer whom Lum falls in love with)

Guests of the Mountain View Inn

* Trixie Van Duzen from Chicago and her dog, Choo-Choo Pie (aka "Blondie")
* Mr.& Mrs. John Smith & daughter, Little Gwendolyn (Mrs. Smith aka "Mame"... "Little Gwendolyn" is actually a midget)
* Misses Sarah and Ella Mae Rogers (actually men dressed as ladies), from Gary, Indiana
* 3 fellers from Chicago
* Professor Collingmore
* Detective Wilson

Characters from the 30-minute Run

* Andy Devine
* Frank W. Randolf (swindles Lum)
* Miss Pitts (the county home-ec lady)
* Opie Cates[url][/url]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2010 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Jimbo, it's great to meet fellow fans of Lum and Abner! It's funny how our observations of the show are so similar. I still have the Great Gildersleeve, Fibber and others to look forward to listen to in order as well.

Thanks for the list of characters! I'm amazed how many of those I don't recognize. I've got a lot of characters/stories to look forward to. I really like how they aren't just the characters, but whole families of characters that really make up a real community. That gives the show so much depth.

Diogenes Smith! That was one of my favorite storylines; love how the characters all adopted the phrase "Wonderful world!" after that. I find myself saying that sometimes, along with common L.A. phrases like "Well if that don't beat the bugs a fightin'" and "Worn to a frazzle... worn to a fraa...zzle!"

Great list! Lots of memories in there!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2010 4:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zap wrote:
Hey Jimbo, it's great to meet fellow fans of Lum and Abner! It's funny how our observations of the show are so similar. I still have the Great Gildersleeve, Fibber and others to look forward to listen to in order as well.

Thanks for the list of characters! I'm amazed how many of those I don't recognize. I've got a lot of characters/stories to look forward to. I really like how they aren't just the characters, but whole families of characters that really make up a real community. That gives the show so much depth.

Diogenes Smith! That was one of my favorite storylines; love how the characters all adopted the phrase "Wonderful world!" after that. I find myself saying that sometimes, along with common L.A. phrases like "Well if that don't beat the bugs a fightin'" and "Worn to a frazzle... worn to a fraa...zzle!"

Great list! Lots of memories in there!


Haha you made me laugh - 'Worn to a frazzle - worn to a Frazzzzzzzzzzzle!"

I always thought it was, "Don't that beat the bugs a'bitiin'!" You're probably right.

I never cared at all for Diogenes. As a matter of fact, that's one of the scenarios I couldn't wait for to be over! But I do like Cedric's, "Wonderful World!" everytime he pops into the Jot 'em Down.

Again, maybe I should look or we should come up with all of those kooky phrases.

"I'll swan to goodness!" - "Course not! That's just an old Eddard's sayin' ", and Abner's innocent, "Huuuuuuh?" whenever there is something either he's about to get in trouble for or that he plain doesn't understand.

"A Thousand or a hundred...", and Grandpapy Spears' "pigeoned toed __" whatever.

One of my favorite scenarios was when Lum was oing to give a big party for Grandpap to get his memory back and the boys went looking at the social section of the St. Louis paper for ideas. And Lum sees an article about a famous St. Louis socialite and decides to take her maiden name as his middle name to promote party - Lum Whitley Eddards. HAHAHA that was just too funny.

I am enjoying this, please share some more! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another saying found frequently is, "A dozen or ten."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jimbo wrote:


I always thought it was, "Don't that beat the bugs a'bitiin'!"


"Igrannies, that's right isn't it?"

Haha, actually maybe it is bugs a bitiin' , that would somehow make more sense. I dunno. I do kind of like the wackiness of 'bugs a fightin', maybe I just hear it that way.

How about,

Grandpap "For the law me sakes!" and "Spaven-legged ___ whatever."

Or when he doesn't believe something: "Priddle-praddle!" or "Sassyfrass! Sas-see frass!"

Surprised: "Well I do know!"

I love how Lum is always telling Abner or Cedric to "Hesh up!"


Quote:
One of my favorite scenarios was when Lum was oing to give a big party for Grandpap to get his memory back and the boys went looking at the social section of the St. Louis paper for ideas. And Lum sees an article about a famous St. Louis socialite and decides to take her maiden name as his middle name to promote party - Lum Whitley Eddards. HAHAHA that was just too funny.

Classic! Lum the debutante! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haha brings a big smile to my face.

Do you ever get the impression that maybe Cedric is retarded? He can drive and has a job but, yes mom, he's a slow one, I'll swan to goodness.

I am curious, where you are in the series, is Dick Huddleston ever around? He disappeared from the show a heap while back where I am - and he is the like the only voice of reason (aside from Grandpap, who seems to be all there.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jimbo wrote:
Haha brings a big smile to my face.

Do you ever get the impression that maybe Cedric is retarded? He can drive and has a job but, yes mom, he's a slow one, I'll swan to goodness.

I like to think he's an idiot savant!

Quote:
I am curious, where you are in the series, is Dick Huddleston ever around? He disappeared from the show a heap while back where I am - and he is the like the only voice of reason (aside from Grandpap, who seems to be all there.)

Do you think that Dick Huddleston might be Goff's normal everyday voice? He's definitely the voice of reason; also it seems like a 'real' voice as opposed to Goff doing a character. I've always thought I bet Goff sounded most like DH himself, or even that it's really just his normal voice.

Yeah, I noticed too that DH was largely absent from the show after the mid 1930's- they mostly just refer to his store, but we never hear him. (I like when Granpap is minding the store, and is too lazy to fill grocery orders so he just tells people to go across the street and get what they need at DH's store! )

I'm up to mid 1946, and you'll be glad to know that yes, in several storylines from mid 1945 and early 1946 DH (voice and all) is back and even a central figure in several stories. The first time I heard him again in a later episode, I was surprised. "Hey, it's actually Dick Huddleston, in the flesh, and once again trying to talk some sense into Lum!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 3:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zap wrote:
Jimbo wrote:
Haha brings a big smile to my face.

Do you ever get the impression that maybe Cedric is retarded? He can drive and has a job but, yes mom, he's a slow one, I'll swan to goodness.

I like to think he's an idiot savant!


I believe you are right! Do you notice, a lot of the end gags of the show revolve around some one "one-upping" Lum. Most of the time it seems as though it is Cedric.

As you suggest, Cedric may not be that stupid. And he's a physical workhorse and a great pinball player. I'm guessing he is about 17 years old, maybe 18? What is your impression of his age?

Quote:
Do you think that Dick Huddleston might be Goff's normal everyday voice? He's definitely the voice of reason; also it seems like a 'real' voice as opposed to Goff doing a character. I've always thought I bet Goff sounded most like DH himself, or even that it's really just his normal voice.


Yes mom, I believe you're right. One reason is because he sounds a bit like Mousey Gray, just not as slow.

Quote:
Yeah, I noticed too that DH was largely absent from the show after the mid 1930's- they mostly just refer to his store, but we never hear him. (I like when Granpap is minding the store, and is too lazy to fill grocery orders so he just tells people to go across the street and get what they need at DH's store! )


Haha Granpap is slick. Grandpap is probably my favorite character, according to the almanac!

Quote:
I'm up to mid 1946, and you'll be glad to know that yes, in several storylines from mid 1945 and early 1946 DH (voice and all) is back and even a central figure in several stories. The first time I heard him again in a later episode, I was surprised. "Hey, it's actually Dick Huddleston, in the flesh, and once again trying to talk some sense into Lum!"


I've told you where I am, Squire Skimp has been absent for at least 50 shows and they have only mentioned his name once or twice. I am guessing he will show up again, too?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking of Cedric, I like how they refer to the grade level he's in as "The Fifth Reader" or whichever level. I never heard that term 'reader' before to refer to a grade level, but it's funny.

I actually picture Cedric is actually in his early 20's, but his mental age keeps him "The Fifth Reader"! Socially, he's like a child, but every now and then he stumbles across something that he's a genius at. He's the kind of guy you tell him do something, and without question he just answers "Yes Mom."

That phrase has always baffled me. Sometimes Lum and Abner use it to- but why "Yes Mom?" At first, I thought Cedric was saying "Yes Lum" but then I noticed he says it to Abner as well. I still don't quite get it, but it's funny just the same.


Squire Skimp is central to a lot of the stories I've been listening to lately. Interesting- because I never really missed him during his absence from the show. I always find myself thinking, "Why do these guys always fall for Squire's schemes?! Don't do it Lum! Don't sign on the dotted line!"

"Ohhh,Tut! Tut! Lum! Nothing to worry about! Now if you'll just sign right here..."

You'd think after so many years of getting ripped off by the guy they'd learn not to trust him, but somehow they always do! Definitely a fun dynamic with that character.

The one character I haven't heard from in a long while is Mousey Gray. He got married, went off to war, came back, and then seemed to promptly disappear from the show. He poked his head in the store once or twice during the first part of 1946, but other than that, not a trace.

Hope everyone has a Happy Thanksgiving- about to go have a great dinner with the family. Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zap wrote:

That phrase has always baffled me. Sometimes Lum and Abner use it to- but why "Yes Mom?" At first, I thought Cedric was saying "Yes Lum" but then I noticed he says it to Abner as well. I still don't quite get it, but it's funny just the same.


I thought it was "Yes, Lum" for a while, but I am certain now that it's, "Yes, mom." I too am baffled at his and have no idea why "elders" are referred o this way, such as the more common, "yes sir/no sir." Maybe it's an Arkansas thing?

Quote:
Squire Skimp is central to a lot of the stories I've been listening to lately. Interesting- because I never really missed him during his absence from the show. I always find myself thinking, "Why do these guys always fall for Squire's schemes?! Don't do it Lum! Don't sign on the dotted line!"

"Ohhh,Tut! Tut! Lum! Nothing to worry about! Now if you'll just sign right here..."

You'd think after so many years of getting ripped off by the guy they'd learn not to trust him, but somehow they always do! Definitely a fun dynamic with that character.


You'd figure, wouldn't you? Those boys get hoodwinked right near every other episode by Squire in the beginning of the show. Somehow, Squire always ends up with only a minimal amount of jail time no matter what sort of fraud he's comimted!

Quote:
The one character I haven't heard from in a long while is Mousey Gray. He got married, went off to war, came back, and then seemed to promptly disappear from the show. He poked his head in the store once or twice during the first part of 1946, but other than that, not a trace.


I'm not going to miss Mousey... he's probably my least-favorite character.

By the way, saw a web site the other day that voted for many OTR best and worsts and they wrote the worst show acting and scripts belonged to Lum and Abner. I was like, what, mom?

The only reason I can figure that is they didn't give the show time to develop or had only listened to random shows. Listening to a block of shows in order is the only way to listen.

http://www.old-time.com/misc/bstwrst.html)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jimbo wrote:


By the way, saw a web site the other day that voted for many OTR best and worsts and they wrote the worst show acting and scripts belonged to Lum and Abner. I was like, what, mom?

The only reason I can figure that is they didn't give the show time to develop or had only listened to random shows. Listening to a block of shows in order is the only way to listen.

http://www.old-time.com/misc/bstwrst.html)

Sworn to goodness!

You're right- it's either as you say,or they're basing the judgement on the 'live' sitcom version of the show, in which case, I'd tend to agree!

The biggest irony of judging Lum and Abner badly for 'scripts' is that they rarely used them. As I understand it, the two barely read from their scripts, and improvised much of the dialogue- they just wrote a basic outline of how the story needed to progress. To me, the acting is so good it's hardly acting- they seem to 'become' the characters they play.

Worst acting and scripts? Sassyfrass! Sass-see-frass!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe you are correct about scripting. They probably had a beginning and an ending worked out and spent the rest of the time ad-libbing. That in itself is amazing, considering how good a program they put out.

While there are a few situations in the show I do not particularly care for and a lot of times a scenario might be repeated (Lum fakes a broken leg, for example) the show remains lively and interesting, not to mention funny.

By the way, when I wrote my previous message, I imagined your answer would have been, "Saaaaaaaaaaaaaassy fras!" What do I win?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lifetime supply of Alka Selzer, or Miles Nervine!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimbo



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was hoping for Horlick's Tablets, whatever those were. Wink

Hey... http://tinyurl.com/2a5wppg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
crich70



Joined: 19 Sep 2008
Posts: 322
Location: Monroe Wisconsin

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Believe it or not they still exist. According to Wikipedia (link below)
Quote:
In America, Horlicks Tablets were sold as a candy, offered in a glass bottle resembling an aspirin jar. These tablets were used during World War II as an energy boosting treat by U.S., UK and other soldiers. Today, these are packaged in foil pouches, manufactured in Malaysia as Horlicks Malties.


Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction. Smile

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horlicks


Jimbo wrote:
I was hoping for Horlick's Tablets, whatever those were. Wink

Hey... http://tinyurl.com/2a5wppg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
boston blackie



Joined: 13 Oct 2009
Posts: 90
Location: illinois

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Horlick malted milk. I remember that as a kid while living in Racine, Wisconsin. Also Horlick High School was the arch rival of mine, Park High School. Another note to the discussion above. Never thought it would lead to my home town.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Zap



Joined: 16 Nov 2010
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you guys notice those old ads actually still work? I find myself at the store looking at the Alka Seltzer and thinking to myself, "When you're down to 4, that's the time to get some more..."

And they made that Horlicks stuff sound like it could do everything from make you sleep better at night, settle an upset stomach, replace meals and make you thinner, and I don't know what all.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:    View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Mysteryshows.com Forum Index -> Comedy All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Listen To Free Old Time Radio On Our Home Page